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What Was it Like to be Common Person in the Empire of Rome




Common People in Roman Empire


This book discusses the lives of the average Roman citizen instead of the Emperors, Senators and other Potentates. The daily life of the average Roman varied depending on whether thew lived in Rome or one of the smaller cities or in the countryside. However the universal language and culture of the Empire meant that its citizens enjoyed a commonality of experience that bonded the far flung provinces together.

Within the teeming multitudes of the cities each Roman family went on its daily business. They haggled with vendors in the market, they attended public baths and performances. If they were one of the many poor or unemployed, they received patronage from the rich and wealthy, who bought their loyalty in exchange for bread and circuses. They worshipped the same gods of Rome, and their own personal household penates, the guardian spirits of their household. Their rural counterparts led more simple lives, geared to the seasons and the harvest.

Although this was a pre-industrial society, we will recognize many things in their daily lives that are still present in ours. We will see things from our daily experiences including advertising posters, graffiti, sports hooliganism, street crime, fire departments, traffic laws, and celebrities and music stars. On a deeper level we will find a legal system and educational system that resembles ours today.




Table of Contents

THE COMMON PEOPLE OF ANCIENT
  HOW LATIN BECAME THE LANGUAGE OF THE WORLD - PART
  HOW LATIN BECAME THE LANGUAGE OF THE WORLD - PART
  HOW LATIN BECAME THE LANGUAGE OF THE WORLD - PART
  THE LATIN OF THE COMMON PEOPLE - PART
  THE LATIN OF THE COMMON PEOPLE - PART
  THE LATIN OF THE COMMON PEOPLE - PART
  THE LATIN OF THE COMMON PEOPLE - PART
  THE LATIN OF THE COMMON PEOPLE - PART
  THE POETRY OF THE COMMON PEOPLE OF ROME: THEIR METRICAL
  THE POETRY OF THE COMMON PEOPLE: DEDICATORY AND EPHEMERAL
  THE EDICT OF DIOCLETIAN AND THE HIGH COST OF
  EXTRACTS FROM DIOCLETIAN'S LIST OF MAXIMUM
  PRIVATE BENEFACTIONS AND THEIR EFFECT ON THE MUNICIPAL LIFE OF THE
  CORPORATIONS AND TRADE
  GAIUS MATIUS, A FRIEND OF
  [36] G. W.


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